Tag Archives: Education

Building Skill in Summer: New Orleans

Tomorrow I head to New Orleans to teach on The Prince’s Foundation’s Summer Program. I look forward to working with my fellow instructors, the students, and to seeing the Big Easy again. My involvement with the Foundation’s programs reaches all the way back to two programs we developed in 1996 and 1997, the first two American Summer Schools of what was then called the Prince of Wales’s Institute of Architecture. Our programs ranged all across the United States, from Asheville to Charlottesville to Richmond, and from Los Angeles to Berkeley.


Continue reading

Three Glimpses of the Institute: Rome, New York, Florida

[As we approach the twentieth anniversary of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, I thought I would share with you a memoir I wrote for our tenth anniversary.]

ROME

Just before Rosabelli and I walked into the Piazza Navona I asked her to pause for a moment, knowing the thrill that she was about to experience for the first time. Then she walked into the Piazza and with awe she gasped at the beauty of the plashing fountains with their brilliant sunlit sculptures set off in front of the darkly towering San’Agnese in Agone. Large tears welled up in her eyes as she breathed in a small part of what Rome offers an architect. It was Rosabelli’s first trip to Rome from her native Brazil and it was also the Institute’s inaugural Rome Architectural Drawing Tour.

Rome-4
Continue reading

Palladio as Paradigm for Education and Practice Today

Lecture delivered at the University of Notre Dame’s conference: From Vernacular to Classical: The Perpetual Modernity of Palladio, June 10-12, 2011

Dean Lykoudis, faculty, alumni, students, and colleagues it is a pleasure to be back at Notre Dame for this remarkable conference and exhibition. I offer my sincere thanks to the School of Architecture and Lucien for organizing the conference, to Lucien and Ali for their thoughtful and thought-provoking New Palladians, to the RIBA for their inspirational exhibit celebrating 500 years of Palladio, to Calder Loth for his inimitable contributions to Palladio’s Transatlantic journey, and last to my fellow Institute of Classical Architecture & Art trustee, Anne Kriken Mann, for ensuring that the Palladio made it to America.

Reflecting upon the conference theme of the “Perpetual Modernity of Palladio,” I began to question Palladio’s value today. What lessons can Palladio teach us?

Continue reading

Franck Speaks at Boston’s Pella Pro Expo

Scan0001

 

Speaking at the Pella Pro Expo in Boston yesterday, at the TD Garden was terrific fun. Thanks to Pete Miller at Restore Media for developing this break-out educational content at the 2011 Pella Pro Expos. While I didn’t do a head count we had a packed room that I estimate held about 200 folks, nearly all architects. My lectures focused on the relevance of classical architecture to contemporary American domestic architecture and a second session on marketing tactics with a particular focus on social networking.

Continue reading

Pages from My Sketchbook: Observation and Representation

Architecture seen through the hand and eye, moments of memory recorded, elements studied and filed away in my mind for inspiration: my sketchbooks are filled with these, some of which I share here.

Continue reading

Designing in Atlanta

Last night at the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation in Atlanta, Brent Hull and I lectured on our new book Winterthur Style Sourcebook: Traditional American Rooms. The event was organized by the ICA&CA Southeast Chapter, and sponsored by Randall Brothers. Thank you! Today we’re teaching a seminar on classical design and good practice in millwork at Historical Concepts’ wonderful office. High up on the 4th floor, our students are hard at work on an esquisse for a classical interior. The deadline is an hour away! It’s great to see such talent and focus from these terrific architects and designers.

Img00025-20100206-1402

Architecture Students at Work

This past Friday, in nine straight hours of intense work, my graduate architecture students at Notre Dame completed their first esquisse, en loge, designing a hypothetical urban residence which they will develop over the next four weeks.  Being well-taught by Professor Richard Economakis and the other dedicated Notre Dame faculty, these first year graduate students with only a semester of architectural education under their belts, performed admirably!  What a rare joy it is to have an architecture school that teaches students architecture, instead of abstract, incomprehensible, inconsequential, personal expression.  Hope you enjoy these pictures of my delightful students hard at work creating beautiful, meaningful, appropriate architecture.